Tuesday, February 26, 2013

UK Has New Resource for Hot Hair + Leather Boot History


Scissor Paper Rock Mobile Hairdresser in London...check it out!

 
Scissor Paper Rock hairdresser is a mobile hairstylist who covers the capital. If you are always stuck at work or at home, this company might help you to keep looking good even when you are too busy or for a reason or another you cannot go out.
 
A mobile hairdresser is a service that you can book on the phone or online and a qualified hair stylist will come to your house. The services offered are very similar to those at your local salon, namely hair cuts and blow dry, highlights and colouring.
 
The mobile hairdresser is also able to offer more competitive pricing because the company does not have many overheads such as expensive rents, and business rates therefore the savings are passed to the customer who can enjoy great haircuts at lower prices.

Scissor Paper Rock hairdresser’s clients are people who are house bounds. Mums with young children often cannot go out and taking time off the house is difficult. Or people with injuries who have problem walking might also benefits from the mobile hairdresser services. Or simply some clients are just too busy to go the hair salon.
 
Many times people take an appointment at the local salon and they are made to wait anyway. With the mobile hairdresser this does not happen. The clients can book a time slot and the hairstylist will the there according to what was agreed. No more waste of your time and  you can carry on working.
 

Scissor Paper Rock Mobile operates in central London 7 days a week from morning till evening, the hairdressers are always just one phone call away.
 
 
How Leather Boots for Women Came Into Fashion

Women wore leather boots as early as the 19th century, although they did not truly become fashion at the time until the late 1960s. A decade later, their popularity in the mainstream increased, and this has been the trend ever since. In the years that followed, an appearance of leather boots in the street was perceived as a high item. All these were happening despite the ever-rising price of leather, a factor that for a while made plastic boots more popular. The demerits of this synthetic material quickly became obvious, and this made leather a material of choice for the many shoe designers. However, it was until the late 1970s that leather boots for women entered the fashion industry.
By 1977, twenty percent of women’s shoe sales in the U.S. comprised leather boots. A few years later, straight-leg designs, which were mostly worn over jeans pants, gained popularity at the expense of form-fitting leather boots. The end of 1970s saw an increase in popularity of the shortened, calf-length, leather boots, which were often worn, layered with tights and socks. Throughout the roaring 1980s, high-rise, leather boots for women saw a fall in popularity. Instead, various ankle, leather boots swayed many, so did pull-on, calf-length, and low-heel styles, which most often were paired with long skirts.
During the end the decade, the thigh-high, leather boots for women regained popularity, which were loose-fitting, low heel boots often colored. Following the explosion of the dance club culture in the 1990s, both platform-soled and knee-length boots gained mainstream popularity. Many footwear designers struggled to adapt to these trendy styles, although the mainstream fashion did not took them up. By 1993, leather boots for women became so popular that led to the declaration of the year as that of leather boots. All styles of leather boots flourished, with all designed to be worn at any time with any skirt length. The fashion leather boots, in the late 1990s, became widespread and as popular as they were back in the late 1970s. 

Any fashionable and clothes-conscious woman was bound to at least own a single pair of leather boot, most often bearing metal accents. They would wear them with knee-length skirts for business and casual wear. Ankle leather boots also maintained popularity, while in the later part of the decade of the 2000, knee-length boots were widespread in the mainstream. Thigh-high leather boots, during 2009, favourite and popular within the fashion press, and as years passed, many women preferred taller leather boots, accessorized with zippers, chains and buckles.
 In addition, western themes also joined the vogue, with the conventional cowboys boots inspired designers. All these were happening despite the ever-rising price of leather, a factor that for a while made plastic boots more popular. The demerits of this synthetic material quickly became obvious, and this made leather a material of choice for the many shoe designers. However, it was until the late 1970s that leather boots for women entered the fashion industry. However, since the late 1960, one scenario has remained constant. Leather boots for women has been and always be, in a variety of guises, be fancied by women all over the world.
*Paid blog post
 

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